Vintage Photos - Santa Ana Naval Air Station / Marine Corps Air Station Tustin - Lighter-than-Air (LTA) Base with Blimp Hangars

This base was built in 1942 as the Santa Ana Naval Air Station.  The blimps were used to patrol America's coastline primarily to watch for enemy submarines.  We will be posting more historical information on the blimp hangars soon. The "Santa Ana" designation was included because it was located in unincorporated territory.   According to some sources, in the early 1950s the facility was known as "Hangar City" during a period between being operated by the Navy and then the Marines. Later the name was changed to the Marine Corps Air Station Tustin.

Most of these photos are from the collection of the Tustin Area Historical Society. A few are from the Library of Congress. More information on the LTA base can be found at

Click the thumbnail images to see the full photo. Contact our webguy if you have any questions or have additional photos or information to add.

Here are links to recent historical works on the base and the hangars:

Click here for modern photos of the base as it currently looks today.

 

Aerial View of the Marine Corps Air Station Tustin - Lighter-than-Air Base

Inside one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin- Lighter-than-Air BaseHelicopters stored inside one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air Base

Inside one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air Base

Aerial view - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air Base

Construction of one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air Base

Construction of one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air BaseConstruction of one of the blimp hangers - Marine Corps Air Station - Lighter-than-Air Base

 

 

Marine Air Station Tustin - Lighter-than-Air base in Tustin, January 21, 1963. From left to right: Col. Abblett, commanding officer; Dr. Bob Brown, Exchange Club president; C. M. Featherly, County Supervisor; and Colonel Anderson.

 

 

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